Patient Education

North Central Ophthalmology would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

North Central Ophthalmology provides a full range of medical services including the following:


Cataracts

Each year, cataracts affect millions of people, including more than half of all Americans aged 60 and older. A cataract is a painless clouding of the eye's natural lens that is caused by a buildup of protein. A cataract can form in one or both eyes. If left untreated, cataracts worsen over time and interfere with everyday activities such as reading or driving. Night vision is usually most affected. When cataracts are in their early stages, people are helped by brighter lighting. As cataracts get worse, however, most people require surgery. ...


Read More...

Diabetic Eye Disease

Patients with diabetes are at a higher risk for developing eye conditions as a complication their disease. Over 40 percent of patients diagnosed with diabetes develop some form of eye disease as a result of their disease. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and the primary cause of blindness in the United States. ...


Read More...

Dry Eye

Dry eye is a common condition in which the eyes are insufficiently lubricated, leading to itching, redness and pain. The eyes can become dry and irritated because the tear ducts are not producing a sufficient number of tears, or because there is a chemical imbalance in the tears themselves. Natural tears require a particular chemical balance to lubricate the eyes efficiently. ...


Read More...

Humphrey Visual Field

The Humphrey visual field is a diagnostic test to measure visual fields, or perimetry. The Humphrey visual field test measures the entire area of peripheral vision that can be seen while the eye is focused on a central point. During this test, lights of varying intensities appear in different parts of the visual field while the patient's eye is focused on a certain spot. The perception of these lights is charted and then compared to results of a healthy eye at the same age of the patient to determine if any damage has occurred. ...


Read More...

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of related diseases that damage the optic nerve, resulting in vision loss and possible blindness. Many people affected with glaucoma do not experience symptoms, and may not be aware that they have the disease until they have lost a significant amount of vision. With early detection and treatment, however, eyes can be protected against the serious loss of vision or blindness. Catching glaucoma at an early, treatable stage is one important reason to have regular, thorough eye examinations. A leading cause of blindness and visual impairment in the United States, glaucoma affects patients of all ages. ...


Read More...

Intraocular Lenses

An intraocular lens (IOL) is an artificial replacement lens implanted when a patient's natural lens has been surgically removed during cataract surgery. A wide variety of replacement lenses is available to cataract patients. Each type of lens has its own advantage for post-surgery vision, The most effective lens to use depends on the patient's preferences and particular vision goals, which can differ according to individual occupations and lifestyles. IOLs often eliminate the need for glasses or contacts after cataract surgery, conveniently providing most patients with clear vision. ...


Read More...

Cataract Surgery

A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye; cataract surgery is performed to improve vision by replacing the clouded lens with an artificial one. Cataracts affect millions of people in the United States each year. Most cataracts are the result of aging, though some form as a result of genetic factors, disease or injury. Cataract surgery is common, and considered safe and effective. ...


Read More...

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that affects the eyes. The length of time a person has diabetes determines his or her likelihood of developing diabetic retinopathy. It is the most common diabetic eye complication, and a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Diabetic retinopathy causes the blood vessels that supply nourishment to the retina, the light-sensitive lining in the back of the eye where vision is focused, to weaken, swell and leak, causing a loss of vision. ...


Read More...

Optical Coherence Tomography

Optical coherence tomography, also known as OCT, is an imaging system that uses light waves to produce a high-resolution view of the cross-section of the retina and other structures in the interior of the eye.

Conditions Detected With an OCT

The images can help with the detection and treatment of serious eye conditions such as: ...


Read More...

Punctal Plugs

Punctal plugs, also known as punctum plugs, lacrimal plugs or occluders, are a method of treating dry eyes. Punctal plugs can relieve dry eye symptoms when eye drops or ointments fail. Punctal plugs are placed in the opening of the tear duct, reducing the natural drainage of tears and keeping the eyes moist. Punctal plugs can be a temporary or permanent solution to dry eyes. ...


Read More...

Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty

Selective laser trabeculoplasty, or SLT, is an FDA-approved laser procedure for the treatment of open-angle glaucoma. SLT is an advanced treatment option that lowers eye pressure and increases fluid drainage. It is minimally-invasive and uses low levels of energy to selectively pinpoint the areas of the trabecular meshwork, relieving the symptoms of glaucoma. If needed, the procedure can be repeated several times without causing damage to surrounding tissue. ...


Read More...

Types of IOLs

A wide range of replacement lenses are available to cataract patients, each offering different advantages for post-surgery vision. The most effective lens to use depends on the patient's individual preferences and goals for their vision. The lenses eliminate the need for glasses or contacts after cataract surgery, providing most patients with convenient, effective results for their specific vision conditions. ...


Read More...

Posterior Capsular Opacification

Posterior capsular opacification (PCO) is the most frequent complication of cataract surgery. This condition affects 1 out of 4 patients within 5 years of undergoing cataract surgery. A posterior capsular opacification is also known as a secondary cataract.

During cataract surgery, the clouded lens in the eye is removed from the lens capsule and replaced with a clear, artificial lens called an IOL. Weeks, months or years after the surgery, some patients experience a loss of vision. This sometimes happens because the lens capsule becomes cloudy or wrinkled, blurring the patient's vision once again. ...


Read More...

RESTASIS®

RESTASIS® Ophthalmic Emulsion is the only prescription eye drop available for patients, who have chronic dry eye, that helps increase the eye's ability to produce more tears. Used according to prescription, patients who use RESTASIS® report a noticeable increase in tear production, as opposed to those using steroid drops or tear duct, or punctal plugs. ...


Read More...

The Zeiss IOL Master®

The Zeiss IOL Master® is a high-precision measurement tool that is used to measure the axis length, corneal curvature and the anterior chamber depth of the eye. The measurements obtained provide physicians with the information needed in the selection of the right IOL to be used for the patient undergoing cataract surgery. ...


Read More...

Trabeculectomy

Trabeculectomy, also known as glaucoma filter surgery, is a surgical procedure that removes part of the trabecular meshwork of the eye in order to increase the drainage of fluid. A trabeculectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures used to treat open-angle and chronic closed-angle glaucoma. A new drainage passage is created during the procedure by cutting a small hole in the sclera (the white part of the eye) and creating a collection pouch between the sclera and conjunctiva (the outer covering of the eye). This serves to create a system for bypassing the blocked drainage channels and encourages fluid drainage and reduces eye pressure. ...


Read More...

AcrySof® IQ Toric IOL

Intraocular lenses are used during cataract surgery to replace the damaged lens of the eye with an implant that clears up and corrects vision, oftentimes leaving patients with little to no dependence on glasses.

Up until now, patients with astigmatism did not have the same opportunities that other cataract patients have had in correcting their condition with the types of IOL lenses that were available. Typically, the astigmatic patient would need an additional surgical procedure, such as refractive surgery or LASIK, to correct their vision after the procedure. If the patient did not want to undergo another surgical procedure, the only option for correction would be the use of either contact lenses or glasses to address their astigmatism. ...


Read More...

Retinal Complications of Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgery is considered one of the safest and most commonly performed surgical procedures. There is a risk of complication for any type of surgery, including cataract surgery, even when performed by the most skilled and competent surgeon.

Complications of cataract surgery while considered rare, may include the following: ...


Read More...

The Ahmed™ Glaucoma Valve

The Ahmed™ glaucoma valve is a medical device used in the treatment of glaucoma for those patients not responding to medication or surgical intervention. Used to regulate ocular pressure levels, the Ahmed glaucoma valve is a tube system that drains excess fluid from the eye. The fluid flows through the valve and out of the eye into a reservoir where it can be safely absorbed by surrounding tissue. It is implanted on the outer surface of the eye, but covered by conjunctival tissue so it is not visible to others or felt by the patient. ...


Read More...

AcrySof® IQ ReSTOR® IOL

AcrySof® IQ ReSTOR® IOL is an intraocular lens that provides a full range of vision for patients after cataract surgery, significantly decreasing their dependence on glasses or contact lenses. The ReSTOR IOL replaces the natural lens of the eye which has been removed during surgery. Its optic design enables it to bend light to a focal point of the retina, facilitating distance vision. By distributing light on the retina in such a way that images at various distances are clearly perceived, it provides multifocal visual clarity. ...


Read More...

Tecnis® Multifocal IOL

The Tecnis Multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) can be used for those patients with or without presbyopia who want to have near, intermediate and distance vision without relying on glasses or contact lenses. Cataract surgery, which replaces the eye's cataract-impaired lens with an artificial clear lens (IOL) is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in the United States. ...


Read More...

Chalazion

A chalazion is a small, non-infectious lump that develops in the upper or lower eyelid due to the blockage of the meibomian gland, an oil gland in the eyelid. The meibomian gland produces fluid that lubricates the eye. While children do develop chalazions, they more commonly affect adults between the ages of 30 to 50. ...


Read More...

Eye Anatomy

The eye is a complex organ that works much like a camera, focusing light rays and forming an image. On the surface of the eye is the cornea, a thin, clear layer of tissue that provides a window for light to pass through. In a healthy eye, the cornea bends or refracts light rays so they focus precisely on the retina in the back of the eye. ...


Read More...

Fuchs' Dystrophy

Fuchs' dystrophy is the gradual deterioration of the endothelial cells located on the innermost layer of the cornea. The endothelial cells, called pumper cells, help remove excess fluid from the cornea. As the endothelial cells deteriorate, fluid begins to build up in the cornea resulting in distorted vision, swelling and pain. Once endothelial cells are lost, they do not grow back. ...


Read More...

Laser Peripheral Iridotomy

Laser peripheral iridotomy, also known as LPI, is a laser procedure used to lower eye pressure in patients with narrow-angle glaucoma. Narrow-angle glaucoma is a condition that occurs when the angle between the iris and the cornea in the eye is too small, resulting in a blockage of fluid in the drainage channel of the eye. Using a laser, a small hole is made in the iris to increase the angle between the iris and cornea allowing fluid to drain from the eye. ...


Read More...

Ocular Hypertension

Ocular hypertension is a condition where the intraocular pressure (IOP) in the eyes is higher than normal. A normal pressure reading falls between 10 mm Hg and 21 mm Hg. Anything greater than 21 mm Hg is considered hypertensive. The increased pressure is caused by a problem in the drainage of fluid produced in the eye. ...


Read More...

Neuro-Ophthalmology

Neuro-ophthalmology, a subspecialty of both neurology and ophthalmology, examines the relationship between the optic nerve and systemic disorders that affect vision and movement of the eye. Neuro-opthalmologists are able to evaluate and diagnose a variety of medical conditions with a neurology, ophthalmology and medical perspective. ...


Read More...

Blepharospasm

Blepharospasm is a condition in which the eyelids spasm, closing involuntarily, forcing the patient to blink abnormally. Blepharospasm is a form of focal dystonia or abnormal contractions of the eye muscles. Patients with blepharospasm have normal vision, but the disturbance interferes with visual perception and may, in severe cases, result in functional blindness. ...


Read More...

Corneal Abrasion

The cornea is the clear covering of the front of the eye which bends, or refracts, light rays as they enter the eye. Injuries, such as scratches or cuts, on the surface of the cornea are known as corneal abrasions. Due to the amount of nerve cells in the cornea, a corneal abrasion is usually painful. A corneal abrasion causes significant pain and discomfort; it is a serious condition that should be medically addressed as soon as possible. ...


Read More...

Ptosis

Ptosis is the drooping of the upper eyelid. Although ptosis is usually the result of aging, it sometimes develops after eye surgery or injury. Sometimes the condition is congenital. Because ptosis may be present due to serious causes, patients with this disorder should be checked by a medical professional to determine whether treatment is necessary and, if so, what kind. ...


Read More...

Excessive Tearing

Tears are necessary to lubricate the eyes and wash away foreign bodies and other particles. Excessive tearing, also known as epiphora, occurs when too many tears are produced or when the eyes are unable to drain properly.

Causes of Excessive Tearing

Tearing of the eyes can be caused by several different factors, including: ...


Read More...

Allergic Conjunctivitis

Allergic conjunctivitis is a common eye condition that affects millions of Americans, causing eye irritation and chronic discomfort. The condition is triggered by airborne allergens, such as pollen, mold, dust or pet dander. In patients with allergies, contact with such airborne substances results in inflammation of the conjunctiva, the clear layer of tissue lining the eyelids and covering the white of the eye. While extremely uncomfortable, allergic conjunctivitis does result in any serious visual impairment. ...


Read More...

Conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis, commonly referred to as pink eye, is an infection or inflammation of the conjunctiva, the membrane that lines the eyelid and covers the white part of the eyeball. The inflammation affects the blood vessels in the eye and gives the eye a pink or red appearance. Pink eye can be caused by either a bacterial or viral infection, an allergic reaction, a foreign object in the eye or a blocked tear duct. Pink eye can be contagious, so proper diagnosis and prompt treatment are important. ...


Read More...

Pseudotumor Cerebri

Pseudotumor cerebri is a condition that causes increased pressure inside the skull, resulting in symptoms similar to those of a brain tumor, particularly visual disturbances. It is caused by a buildup of cerebrospinal fluid within the brain and, untreated can lead to vision loss.

Certain medications or underlying medical conditions may cause increased intracranial pressure, resulting in pseudotumor cerebri. When no underlying cause can be determined, the condition is referred to as idiopathic intracranial hypertension. While pseudotumor cerebri can be the result of a congenital condition, and can occur in children as well as adults, it is most commonly diagnosed in women of childbearing age. ...


Read More...

Pterygium

A pterygium is a painless, non-cancerous growth of the conjunctiva, the lining that covers the white part of the eye. The pterygium may grow on the cornea, which covers the iris, the colored part of the eye. A pterygium usually begins at the nasal side of the eye and can be different colors, including red, pink, white, yellow or gray. ...


Read More...

Iritis

Iritis, also known as anterior uveitis, is an inflammation of the iris, the colored portion of the eye. The iris is located at the front of the uvea, a highly vascular fibrous tissue. Iritis is the more common form of uveitis and frequently manifests in young to middle-aged individuals. Iritis usually develops quickly and may only affect one eye. ...


Read More...


Back to top